Tag: vegan

Food Yoga Level 2 open for enrollment

Food Yoga Level 2 open for enrollment

The Food Yoga Academy is now offering Food Yogi level 2 certification, however, students will have first completed level 1 to be eligible.

The Food Yogi Level 2 Certification will dive deeper into the art and science of food yoga, providing much more information, case studies, and realizations, which will equip students with a thorough understanding of the science.

Students will receive both a PDF certificate they can hang on their wall, as well as a digital badge they can proudly display on their online resume, website and social media pages.

Once students have completed both levels they are then eligible for Food Yoga Master training where they will be invited to spend a week with me in Colombia at Juliana’s Animal Sanctuary and retreat.

I have really enjoyed taking this course. It has been very interesting and has given me a lot of ideas for strategies I wish to incorporate into my daily life. – Gail Hollingsworth

I didn’t expect so much information on energy, physics, sacred geometry… and I absolutely loved it! Eating apples became a very different experience since then. Paul’s interview in the beginning of the course and Mathew Bates’ testimony at the end were incredible, and provided both a great introduction and a great conclusion to the entire course. – Ana

To learn more about the Food Yoga Academy visit www.foodyogaacademy.com

 

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Food Yogi Certification Level 1 – Enrollment open

Food Yogi Certification Level 1 – Enrollment open

The Food Yoga Academy, the brainchild of International director of Food for Life, Paul Rodney Turner (aka Priyavrata das) has officially launched.

The Academy’s first course is Food Yogi Certification Level 1, where students can learn the fundamentals of the food yoga lifestyle and how to enrich their lives through conscious eating and devotion. Based on the teachings of his book, FOOD YOGA – Nourishing Body, Mind & Soul, students will learn the art and science of eating with consciousness and compassion to provide a framework to elevate the act of eating from the dry and mundane to a soul-satisfying experience.

In this introduction to Food Yoga, Turner lays out the 10 fundamental truths.

Students will learn about the more subtle aspect of food and how to achieve optimum health by practicing the Food Yogi diet and lifestyle, which includes, what to eat, when to eat, water therapy, detoxing and the sacred geometry of wholefoods.

The courses will also include raw vegan food demonstrations, including smoothies, pates and crackers, cheesecakes, and soups, etc.

Students will be tested at the end of the course to earn their certification.

WHAT IS FOOD YOGA?

“This Level 1 course gives the fundamentals of the prasadarian lifestyle,” says Turner. “However, in Level 2 we will dive deep into all the details of preparing food with love in order to nourish the mind and spirit.

His book food yoga was a direct response to the inspiration behind Food for Life, Srila Prabhupada who said that “Everyone should get a chance to take prasadam*.”

“I realized that we had to empower people with the knowledge of prasadam but in order to do that I had to build a framework for understanding. The book, therefore, takes the reader on a journey of first discovering how food and thoughts are energy and I present scientific proof to back these statements,” he explains.

The Food Yoga Certification Level 1 is available now for $97, however, a special limited launch discount is being offered to the first 100 students with the coupon code: 50yoga2018

To learn more, visit www.FoodYogaAcademy.com

* Prasadam: Pure plant-based food that has been offered to God with devotion.

 

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The Living La Vida Vegan Summit is Live!

The Living La Vida Vegan Summit is Live!

Recently I was interviewed on the Living La Vida Vegan Summit and it was a great experience. I shared a lot of new information that I am sure you’ll love. Go check it out now

My friend, Stephanie Hutchinson, is on a serious mission to help people who are unhappy in their bodies LOVE the way they look and feel when eating an abundance of different foods and flavors.

She is directly fighting all the self-shame and self-loathing that women all over the world are facing by creating a FREE INTERVIEW series to help them you into your healthiest body yet – Living La Vida Vegan.

Click now to go check it out. I am one of 20 other healthy experts that were interviewed and the line up is rather awesome, including Dr. Joel Fuhrman, Dr. Will Tuttle, Osha Key, Torre Washington, Lorna McCormack, Rachel Black, and Mark Reinfeld to name just a few!

 

 

GO HERE NOW to get access!

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How to Make Coffee Salted Caramel Ice Cream – VEGAN

How to Make Coffee Salted Caramel Ice Cream – VEGAN

Anyone that has been a vegan or raw vegan foodie for a while knows very well about the using frozen bananas as a “go-to” vegan ice cream. However, the reality is this so-called “ice cream” fails on so many levels. First of all, ice cream is meant to be fatty (creamy), so let me show you how to make a really healthy vegan ice cream that looks and tastes like real dairy ice cream.

This recipe can be adjusted quite easily to accommodate all kinds of different flavors. However, this one is epic on so many levels. I made it with organic Colombian coffee too!

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups of Coconut Cream
  • 3 ripe medium size bananas
  • 6 fresh Medjool dates
  • 1/3 cup maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup plant-based milk (soy, almond, etc)
  • 1 cup of chopped vegan caramel
  • 1 pinch of salt

Equipment:

  • Ice Cream Maker
  • Food Processor
  • Spatula

 

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How to Make a Super Easy Vegan Cheesecake

How to Make a Super Easy Vegan Cheesecake

This is a very easy recipe, but the final product is amazing. 

Preparation time: 30 minutes.

Base

  • 330 grams plain vegan cookies
  • 1 cup of chopped dried apricots
  • 1/2 cup of coconut oil

Method:

Process in a processor until the mix is lightly holding together. You want it to still be a little crumbly. Pat it firmly into a springform pan and set in fridge. 

Filling:

  • 2 medium-sized bananas
  • 1 cup of soaked raw cashews
  • 1 cup of coconut cream
  • 1 cup of coconut oil
  • 1 cup of cacao butter melted
  • 1 Tbsp of finely chopped turmeric root
  • Juice of 1 fresh lemon
  • 1/2 cup of agave syrup or maple syrup
  • 2 slices of fresh peach

Method:

Again, using the food processor, place all filling ingredients into a bowl and mix until it is smooth. Pour the filling into the base and set in the fridge.

Decorate with slices of peach and drizzle with some chocolate sauce.

Chocolate sauce:

Mix all together to make the sauce.

  • 2 Tbsp Cacao powder
  • 1/4 cup of melted coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup of agave syrup

FUN FACT: Vegan dog food offers many health benefits as well and here are some easy recipes

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Foster the People receive FOOD YOGA and a vegan lunch

Foster the People receive FOOD YOGA and a vegan lunch

Mark Pontius and Phil Danyew from Foster the People are in Colombia to perform at the famous Festival Estereo Picnic along with other big names like Jack White and Damian Marley. Mark and Phil dropped by Juliana’s Animal Sanctuary to meet with the rescued animals and enjoy a vegan lunch.

Mark-Phil-FosterthePeople-Visit-02

I made a Quinoa vegetable curry, baked potatoes, cauliflower buffalo wings with hot sauce, and a delicious mango, spinach, avocado salad. The boys relished the lunch as we talked about the work of Food for Life and Juliana’s Sanctuary. They were interested to learn about my experience as a monk and what is means to be a food yogi. Mark and Phil shared their musical journey and how they go to where they are now and then walked around the farm to meet all the animals here. Mark and Phil were amazed at how big Balarama, our resident ox is and yet also how peaceful and gentle he is.

Mark-Phil-FosterthePeople-Visit-e

They both fed the horse and the cow and ox and then we visited all the dogs who loved the new visitors. A highlight of their visit was the new bunny. They both melted to see such a lovely and cute little animal snuggle up to them. Phil was particularly taken by the bunny and we got some great photos of him with the bunny. Mark and Phil then made a short endorsement video for the sanctuary, encouraging people to visit and support the project. We are so appreciative of this.

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Next, we went inside and enjoyed a vegan tiramisu made by my wife, Juliana. Mark and Phil invited me, Juliana and her sister, Dana to their concert tomorrow, so we look forward to seeing them again. I then presented Mark and Phil with copies of my books, Food Yoga, and The 5 Noble Truths.

Mark-Phil-FosterthePeople-Visit-01

Mark is a new vegan and has been interested in animal welfare and meditation for a long time. He was genuinely touched by the charity work me and my wife are doing and looks forward to visiting again.

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Vegan Mint Cacao Crackles

Vegan Mint Cacao Crackles

This was a childhood favourite of mine, known back then as “Chocolate Crackles” and was nothing more than puffed rice mixed with chocolate sauce. Usually, the puffed rice was just the standard coco pops filled with sugar. This recipe calls for plain cacao-flavoured puffed rice.

I decided to make a healthier version of this Australian classic, adding a hint of peppermint as well to set it off as a nice after-dinner snack for adults. My Mint Cacao Crackles are a terrific party snack for kids as well.

It only takes about 5 minutes to make them and this is how you do it.

Chocolate Mix

In a food processor:

  • 6 fresh soft dates
  • 4 Prunes
  • 3 heaped Tbsp smooth organic peanut butter
  • 2 large Tbsp organic coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup raw almonds
  • 2 heaped Tbsp raw cacao powder
  • 3 drop pure peppermint essence

Blend until smooth and set aside.

Puffed Coating

In a separate bowl add:

  • 1 cup cacao puffed rice
  • 1/2 cup dried coconut

Mix together

Method

Roll the chocolate mix into balls and then roll them into the puffed rice mix, squeezing the balls with your hands to make sure the puffed rice sticks. Set them on a tray in the fridge for 30 minutes.

Say a prayer and enjoy!

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How to Make a Fancy Raw Vegan Cheesecake

How to Make a Fancy Raw Vegan Cheesecake

We all like to try something different and for those of you that have never ventured into raw cuisine, this is a nice place to start. This recipe is easy to make, so easy that you only need a decent food processor and a spring form pan. In fact, you don’t even need that, a regular glass pie baking tray will work too. There are a number of variations on this recipe, but this is the most basic. Keep in mind that this recipe uses coconut oil to help it set, however, this will only work best in cooler climates. To make this cheesecake set and cut nicely in warmer climates, you can adjust this recipe to add either 1/3 cup of cacao butter or a thickening agent like carrageenan (Irish moss) which is available in raw form or a powder in larger health food stores. Enjoy!

Ingredients

Easy Raw Vegan Cheesecake

  • 2 cups walnuts
  • 1 cup fresh dates
  • ½ cup dried coconut flakes
  • ¼ cup ginger, grated
  • 1 tsp cardamon powder
  • 2 cups cashews (soaked for 6 hours and drained)
  • 2 x whole lemons (remove skin and seeds)
  • ¾ cup agave syrup
  • ¾ cup coconut oil
  •  ¼ cup of cacao butter (if in a warmer climate) or 2 tsp. carrageenan powder
  • 1 x banana
  • ½ tsp. vanilla essence
  • 1 punnet strawberries
  • 1 tsp size piece of raw beetroot
  • 2 tsp. coconut syrup or honey
  • Superfood Concentrate (Univera Xtra)

Method

Make everything with a food processor.

Base:

  • 2 cups of Walnuts
  • 1 cup fresh dates (or as many as needed to create biscuit crumb texture)
  • 1/2 grated coconut flakes
  • 1/4 cup grated ginger
  • 1 tsp. Cardamom powder (optional)

Process until it looks like biscuit crumbs. Press into 20 cm spring form pan .

Step 1: Process dry ingredients for base

RAWStrawberryCheesecakeFY-STEP1

 

Step 2: Mix just enough to make breadcrumb texture

RAWStrawberryCheesecakeFY-STEP2

 

Step 3: Press into a springform pan or pie baking tray

RAWStrawberryCheesecakeFY-STEP3

Step 4: Press carefully so it is even all around. Set aside.

RAWStrawberryCheesecakeFY-STEP4

Filling:

Add 2 cups of soaked cashews, 2 whole lemons (remove skin and seeds), agave syrup, coconut oil, cacao butter, beetroot, banana, and Vanilla essence into a blender.

Process or blend until smooth. Pour into the base. Set in fridge for 2 hours.

Step 5: Add all ingredients for “cheese” filling

RAWStrawberryCheesecakeFY-STEP5b

Step 6: Process until completely smooth. About 5 minutes. Set aside in fridge for at least 1 hour

RAWStrawberryCheesecakeFY-STEP5

Topping:

  • Sliced strawberries, mango or passionfruit
  • Coconut or agave syrup
  • Coconut oil
  • Superfood concentrate like Univera Xtra

Drizzle a sweet syrup, like coconut syrup, agave nectar or honey over the top. Decorate the top with sliced strawberry or some other fruit.

Step 7: Process fresh strawberries with coconut oil and sweetener

RAWStrawberryCheesecakeFY-STEP6

Step 8: Add some superfood concentrate like Univera Xtra for extra nutrition

RAWStrawberryCheesecakeFY-STEP7

 

Step 9: Pour on cheesecakeRAWStrawberryCheesecakeFY-STEP8

Again set this aside in the fridge and serve when it has firmed up.

Enjoy the holidays!

– Paul, the food yogi

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12 day Nepal Adventure with the Food Yogi April 3 – 14

12 day Nepal Adventure with the Food Yogi April 3 – 14

Join us for this exclusive trek in Nepal in 2015

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Highlights include:

  • Incredible Himalayan trekking in the Annapurnas
  • Whitewater rafting on the Trishuli River w/ overnight camping
  • Exploring the amazing UNESCO architectural wonders of the Kathmandu Valley
  • Boating on Lake Phewa
  • Vegan BBQ and kirtan in the Himalayas
  • Yoga/meditation sessions
  • Seminars on Food Yoga and connecting with the 5 elements
  • Reiki healing for humans and animals
  • Aromatherapy basics

Cost Includes

  • Airport pickup & drop services
  • Hotel in Kathmandu and Pokhara (3 star category by Nepalese standard) in twin sharing room on bed and breakfast basis
  • Insurance, meals and accommodation and other expenses of trekking crew (guide and porters)
  • All your meals (Vegan)
  • Simple tea-house lodge accommodation with 3 meals daily during the trek
  • Necessary trek permit and national park fee
  • Farewell dinner with cultural programs
  • Transportation by tourist bus Kathmandu
  • Pokhara – Kathmandu and Pokhara-Nayapul-Pokhara
  • Himalayan white water rafting for 1 night 2 days
  • Boat ride in Phewa lake Pokhara

BOOK NOW!!! http://foodyogi.org/food-yoga-trek-himalayas/

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The stain on the vegan diet – b12 deficiency. The Solution May Surprise You.

The stain on the vegan diet – b12 deficiency. The Solution May Surprise You.

Bullshit! Yes, actually that’s it. Well, that and cow shit, usually referred to as cow dung. You see, despite the obvious merit of choosing to be a vegan, which essentially means avoiding all foods, clothing and products that are the result of animal suffering; and extending that ideal to advocating that all animals should live independently (including cows and bulls); the vegan ideology does not honestly address the lack of B12 in the diet. And so to live the vegan ideology you absolutely have to take B12 supplements and obviously that is not natural and certainly not the way God and nature intended human life to be.

I mean, seriously, how silly is it to think that humanity has to take supplements in order to justify a more humane way to live? But that is exactly what well-meaning vegans all over the world do, at least those that live in the city. But sadly, very few have the guts to admit that something is terribly wrong with that notion.

What is B12

Vitamin B12, also called cobalamin, is a water-soluble vitamin with a key role in the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system, and for the formation of blood. It is one of the eight B vitamins. It is normally involved in the metabolism of every cell of the human body, especially affecting DNA synthesis and regulation, but also fatty acid synthesis (especially odd chain fatty acids) and energy production. Neither fungi, plants nor animals are capable of producing vitamin B12.
 Only bacteria and archaea have the enzymes required for its biosynthesis.

How do I know if I’m Deficient?

Vitamin B12 deficiency can potentially cause severe and irreversible damage, especially to the brain and nervous system. At levels only slightly lower than normal, a range of symptoms such as fatigue, depression, and poor memory may be experienced. Vitamin B12 deficiency can also cause symptoms of mania and psychosis.

To be fair, however, most cases of B12 deficiency have nothing to do with diet. Rather, sometimes individuals lose their ability to absorb the vitamin and become deficient no matter what sort of diet they follow.

The human physiology of vitamin B12 is complex and, therefore, is prone to mishaps leading to vitamin B12 deficiency. Protein-bound vitamin B12 must be released from these proteins by the action of digestive proteases in both the stomach and small intestine. Gastric acid releases the vitamin from food particles, so people with weak stomach acids are prone to B12 deficiency. Therefore antacid and acid-blocking medications (especially proton-pump inhibitors) may inhibit absorption of B12.

In the non-industrialized world, where bacterial contamination commonly brought traces of B12 to foods, B12 deficiency is largely prevented. However, modern hygiene has eliminated this source, just as indoor living has largely eliminated sunlight, nature’s source of vitamin D.

However, owing to the extremely efficient enterohepatic circulation of B12, the liver can actually store several years’ worth of vitamin B12; therefore, nutritional deficiency of this vitamin is rare in most healthy adults. The level changes of B12 in the body depends on how much is secreted and how much is absorbed. B12 deficiency may take a year to show up if initial stores are low and genetic factors unfavourable, or it may not appear for decades. In infants, B12 deficiency can appear much more quickly.

Absorption of vitamin B12 thus requires 4 key factors:

  1. Healthy Stomach;
  2. Healthy Exocrine pancreas;
  3. Intact Gastric intrinsic factor (glycoprotein);
  4. Healthy small bowel.

Problems with any one of these organs make vitamin B12 deficiency highly likely.

 How much do I need?

The total amount of vitamin B12 stored in the body is about 2–5 mg in adults. Around 50% of this is stored in the liver. Approximately 0.1% of this is lost per day by secretions into the gut, as not all these secretions are reabsorbed.

What is the Solution?

So how to solve this vegan dilemma? Well, it all starts with a load of bull dung or cow dung. You see, B12 is actually made from bacteria that lives in soil and is plentiful wherever farm animals live. Animals like cows eat grass, thus picking up bacteria that then creates B12 vitamin inside their stomachs. B12 is found naturally in manure fertilized soil and synthesized via bacteria which are present in the intestines of animals. However, animals themselves are not capable of synthesizing the vitamin, only the B12 bacteria contain the enzymes capable of breaking it down. Which means, in order for humans to acquire an adequate amount of B12 they must either obtain it from animal sources, fortified foods or multi-vitamins? When someone kills a cow this B12 is present in the meat and thus a carnivorous human does not usually have B12 deficiency. If someone takes dairy products they can also get remnants of B12, but a vegan misses out completely, unless they too live around farm animals and play and work in the same soils where the B12 bacteria exist.

Diane Vukovic (PlenteousVeg.com) points out:

So, how is it that vegetarian animals like cows and sheep can make their own B12 but humans cannot?  One reason is because many vegetarian animals (like cows and sheep) have stomachs with four chambers.  The first chamber, called the rumen, is rich in bacteria which can make B12.  Other animals also have stomachs which are shaped differently and allow more bacterial fermentation.

Another reason that vegetarian animals aren’t B12 deficient is that they often consume soil along with their food.  Soil often contains cobalt, which is necessary for making B12 in the intestines.  As Dr. Justine Butler points out, many primates have been known to eat dirt to naturally treat/combat nutrient deficiencies.  When moved to a zoo and fed a sterile diet, many primates develop B12 deficiencies.

What about Fortified Foods?

Foods fortified with B12 are also sources of the vitamin, but they cannot be regarded as true food sources of B12 since the vitamin is added in supplement form from commercial bacterial production sources such as cyanocobalamin.

As Mike Adams, the Health Ranger points out in his article: Cyanocobalamin is a low-grade, low-quality and slightly toxic (cyanide) form of vitamin B-12 that’s used by all the cheap vitamin manufacturers because it is easy to crystallize and is not sensitive to air-oxidation. It is also up to 100 times cheaper than the higher quality methylcobalamin. What these manufacturers don’t tell you is that this form of vitamin B12 is bound to a toxic, poisonous cyanide molecule that must then be removed from your body by your liver and that even less of it is absorbed by your body.

This form is not perfectly synonymous with the naturally occurring form of methyl-B12 (methylcobalamin), and which is pre-methylated, meaning it’s ready for our biochemistry to put to immediate use. Cyanocobalamin has also been contraindicated in early Leber’s disease, which is hereditary optic nerve atrophy and can also cause severe and swift optic atrophy.

However, even taking high quality vitamin B-12 (methylcobalamin) as an oral dose is largely a waste of money because as much as 99% of what you swallow is not even absorbed!

Adams suggest, “a vitamin B-12 skin patch is now available on the market that delivers methylcobalamin through the skin, using a small medical-grade patch placed behind the ear. Each patch delivers 1000 mcg of methylcobalamin (1,666% DV) in a steady release over a 1-2 day period, after which the patch may be removed and discarded.” However, like oral doses, they cost money and certainly this is not the way nature intended us to get our source of B12.

 Is Cow Manure the Answer?

A summary of the results of a study by Dr. A. Mozafar in Switzerland, reported in the November issue of New Century Nutrition by T. Collin Campbell, Ph.D., and Jeff Gates, D.H.Sc. found that Soils enriched with organic fertilizer (cow manure) resulted in a several-fold increase in the soil’s B12 content, as compared to soils worked with conventional inorganic or chemical fertilizers.

That means, if we choose to live naturally, the way nature and God intended, playing and working in soils where farm animals live then B12 is practically everywhere, and in fact, we can even breath it in, it is so plentiful! But most vegans will declare that all animals are to be independent, even cows and bulls; that animals should never be used by humans for any labour, etc. The problem with those kinds of sweeping statements is that they completely ignore history. You see, from the beginning of time, man and beast have had a symbiotic relationship. The problem today is that this natural and respectful symbiotic relationship has been lost and now most of humanity exploits animals. If however, we respect and love and serve animals, as they do us, then a healthy symbiosis can ensue.

Animals should never be slaughtered for their meat, except in cases of survival where there are no other options for food. But in a world where food is plentiful, this is not the case. In fact, the world has the capacity to feed double the current population; “the problem is not food shortage, but inequitable distribution,” declared the United Nations.

So getting back to cow dung. Yes, the miracle and magic of cow dung. You see, bull dung and cow dung is loaded with the B12 bacteria. So if we use this natural and most powerful manure to fertilise our fruits and vegetable and actually play with the soil they inhabit, we will get more than enough B12 inside our bodies. In fact, India villagers literally play with bull and cow dung, forming them into “cow patties” that are then used for cooking, or taking advantage of the anti-bacterial properties of cow dung by mixing it with clay and covering the walls and floors of their houses, as a means to purify the area and also keep the house cool in the hot summer. In fact, cow dung has proven to be the best natural soil for our gardens. See this informative videos:

[embedplusvideo height=”367″ width=”600″ editlink=”http://bit.ly/1MoDMNt” standard=”http://www.youtube.com/v/oifWngdzwCg?fs=1″ vars=”ytid=oifWngdzwCg&width=600&height=367&start=&stop=&rs=w&hd=0&autoplay=0&react=1&chapters=&notes=” id=”ep2579″ /] [embedplusvideo height=”367″ width=”600″ editlink=”http://bit.ly/1MoDUMX” standard=”http://www.youtube.com/v/oXBgYvhAkvU?fs=1″ vars=”ytid=oXBgYvhAkvU&width=600&height=367&start=&stop=&rs=w&hd=0&autoplay=0&react=1&chapters=&notes=” id=”ep8865″ /]
A village woman has mixed cow dung with mud and spreads it on her floor.
Making cow patties

A cow eats grass and produces milk. A bull eat grass and has the muscle and power to till a field. Both of them excrete loads of B12 fertiliser that man can then use to make the best organically-grown, non-GMO fruits and vegetables. They serve us and we serve them by keeping them happy and healthy. That is how God and nature intended it, but if you listen to some vegans, they will outright reject such notions and either suffer B12 deficiency or supplement with B12 tablets.But for some vegans, such practices would mean acknowledging the reality that living around farm animals is essential for good health and that is hard to do if you don’t acknowledge the natural symbiosis of man and farm animals. We need them just as much as they need us.

So that is my big problem with the vegan ideology, at least the “hard-core” version, and so I choose not to be that kind of vegan but believe that in order for me to live a healthy and natural life, I have to accept that farm animals must be part of my livelihood and the most natural and non-violent way to do that is to either live on a farm with farm animals and grow my own fruits and vegetables using cow manure as a fertiliser. Or obtain B12-enriched cow manure for my city garden, or consume (heaven forbid) non-violent milk from a family-owned cow that is protected and loved.

Getting B12 the Natural way while also improving your golf swing

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My position on dairy

I have abstained from commercial dairy for well over 15 years now. I am a “vegan,” but not in the fanatical and impractical sense, but more so in adhering to the essential truth of the ideology, namely, non-violence to animals. Therefore, whenever it is available (very, very rarely), I will gladly consume milk offered to me by a protected and loved family-owned cow, knowing that her offering was given with love and she is happy, healthy and will live a long and natural life. That kind of milk is actually beneficial and to ignore that possibility is to ignore the entire history of domesticated cows. History has proven that cultures can survive for thousands of years and their people live long, healthy lives when there is a symbiotic relationship between humans and animals. Hundreds of millions of Hindus have used dairy products for many thousands of years, lending credibility to the notion that dairy products can be safe to consume when they are offered with love from healthy cows. To ignore this fact is to allow ourselves to be blinded by our reluctance to even consider evidence that challenges our own personal convictions and the current medical belief.

Big Business has screwed over this ideal

The sad part of that story is how big business took over this once sacred tradition and turned it into a profit-driven hell for all bovine. Sadly, the so-called “ahimsa dairy” standards being promoted today are not as sattvic (pure) as they make out, as clearly evidenced on the Ahimsa Dairy Foundation website.

Their present practices are far from non-harming:

  • Calves with Mothers: 5 days with no further access
  • Conception: Bull for first pregnancy followed by artificial insemination (AI)
  • Milking method: By machine
  • Horns: Disbudding of milking cows
  • Treats: None

To read more on so-called “ahimsa dairy” see: Is Ahimsa Dairy Really Non-Violent? 

It seems whenever commerce is involved there will always be a compromise between purity and integrity. Therefore, because of the controversy surrounding the dairy industry my charity, Food for Life Global does NOT financially support food distribution containing commercial dairy.

Even in India, the “land of the cow,” gross abuse of cows is taking place and commercial milk is now a contaminated cocktail containing detergent, hydrogen peroxide, urea, and contaminated water.

Consuming dairy from a loved, respected and a family-owned protected cow is perfectly in line with at least the ahimsa principles of veganism. But if you’re close-minded, you won’t bring yourself to accept such a possibility. So my feeling is that veganism in the strictest use of the term is flawed and cow dung is the stain on the “white sheet” of this otherwise pure and caring ideology.

Unless you are prepared to eat dirt or live with farm animals and work with their manure, you will need to take a B12 supplement as a vegan and that is just not natural.

Other sources of B12

Certain makers of kombucha cultured tea, list vitamin B12 as naturally present in their product and one brand purports to contain 20% of the daily value of B12 in a single bottle, making kombucha a potential “high” food source of B12. Because kombucha is produced by a symbiosis between yeast and bacteria, the possibility that kombucha contains B12 does not contradict current knowledge, but no scientific studies have yet been published confirming the fact, nor whether the B12 in kombucha is the biologically active B12.

Although these non-animal products may have some b12, according to the vast majority of research in this field, the ONLY reliable source of b12 is dirt and that is why we have to live closer to nature.

Studies that support the need for b12 far outweigh those that say we don’t need it, including those from PCRM.

We are better off when we live closer to nature, and that means living with farm animals like cows. That does not mean you have to drink their milk. The artificial separation of humans and cows is what I believe is a big flaw in any diet or lifestyle ideology, but particularly noticeable in the vegan diet.

I believe it is time to redefine what it means to be a “vegan” and retire the old fanatical, ideologically inconsistent and unhealthy definition of veganism.

B12 Information

Resources on the link between B12 and cow manure

Also read: Antidepressant Microbes In Soil: How Dirt Makes You Happy

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